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Testosterone Enanthate Uses for Delayed Puberty

Delayed puberty occurs when a child does not undergo puberty (the period of sexual maturity) by a certain age -- around age 14 in boys and age 12 in girls. There are many possible causes of delayed puberty. In some cases, the child is just a "late bloomer" and puberty is expected to occur at a later date. In other cases, the underlying cause may be due to a medical problem that requires treatment for puberty to occur.
 
Delayed puberty can be quite troubling to an adolescent. Testosterone enanthate may be used to treat delayed puberty in boys who are expected to otherwise eventually go through puberty but are not responding to psychological support. In these cases, testosterone enanthate is usually used for a brief period, at a relatively low dose, just to get puberty started. Once puberty begins, the body can produce its own hormones and the medication can be stopped.
 
Testosterone replacement therapy may also be used to produce male sex characteristics in adolescents who would not otherwise go through puberty due to certain medical problems. Replacement therapy may need to continue into adulthood in males whose testosterone deficiencies persist beyond puberty.
 

Using Testosterone Enanthate for Breast Cancer

Testosterone enanthate is also approved for use in women with inoperable breast cancer that is spreading to other areas of the body, such as the bones. The medication will not cure the cancer, but may help reduce symptoms or side effects of other breast cancer medications. Usually, testosterone enanthate would be used for women who have surgically had their ovaries removed and/or who are taking anti-estrogen medications.
 
Hormonal treatment of breast cancer is complicated, and each case must be treated individually with the care and expertise of an oncologist. A treatment regimen that is right for one woman may not be a good choice for another woman. Sometimes, androgens such as testosterone enanthate can accelerate breast cancer, causing it to progress more rapidly, so close monitoring is always necessary.
 
Written by/reviewed by:
Last reviewed by: Kristi Monson, PharmD;
Last updated/reviewed:
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