What Is Methyltestosterone Used For?

Treating Low Testosterone With Methyltestosterone

Low testosterone levels can cause a number of symptoms, including:
 
  • Low sex drive (libido)
  • Fatigue and low energy
  • Decreased muscle mass and increased fat mass
  • Problems with erectile function
  • Decreased bone strength
  • Depression
  • Delayed puberty.
 
Of course, a man could have all of these symptoms and still have normal testosterone levels, as most of these symptoms are relatively common. The only way to diagnose low testosterone is by actually measuring levels in the blood. Treating low testosterone levels with methyltestosterone or any other testosterone replacement therapy based on symptoms alone, without testing blood levels, is highly inappropriate and potentially dangerous.
 
There are several different causes of low testosterone in men. Normally, testosterone is produced when the testes are stimulated by certain hormone signals from glands in the brain. Low testosterone can occur due to problems in the brain or the testes. Regardless of where the problem lies, methyltestosterone can increase testosterone levels because it does not rely on either the testes or the brain to accomplish this.
 

Using Methyltestosterone for Delayed Puberty

Delayed puberty occurs when a child does not undergo puberty (the period of sexual maturity) by a certain age -- around age 14 in boys and age 12 in girls. There are many possible causes of delayed puberty. In some cases, the child is just a "late bloomer" and puberty is expected to occur at a later date. In other cases, the underlying cause may be due to a medical problem that requires treatment for puberty to occur.
 
Delayed puberty can be quite troubling to an adolescent. Methyltestosterone may be given to treat delayed puberty in boys who are expected to otherwise eventually go through puberty but are not responding to psychological support. In these cases, this drug is typically used for a brief period, at a relatively low dose, just to get puberty started. Once puberty begins, the body can produce its own hormones and methyltestosterone can be stopped.
 
Testosterone replacement therapy, including methyltestosterone, may also be used to produce male sex characteristics in adolescents who would not otherwise go through puberty due to certain medical problems. Replacement therapy may need to continue into adulthood in men whose testosterone deficiencies persist beyond puberty.
 
The Dirty, Messy Part of BPH

Methyltestosterone Drug Information

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